Woolly monkey and baby
       
     
Foraging capuchin
       
     
Three-toed sloth
       
     
Bolivian red howler monkey
       
     
'Look mum, no hands!'
       
     
Lazing around after lunch
       
     
Route planning the capuchin way
       
     
Woolly monkey and baby
       
     
Woolly monkey and baby

Woolly monkeys are one of the most vulnerable primate species in the world. They are so loud and unavoidable when they travel through the trees, meaning they are an easy target for hunters who covet their meat. The Mascoitania rainforest is a regenerating area of land in the Peruvian Amazon and acts as a safe haven to families of monkeys like this mother and baby who have developed territories in its tree tops. It's a privilege to see this species in the Manu region who are so under threat. 

Foraging capuchin
       
     
Foraging capuchin

Capuchins are some of the savviest monkeys I've seen who can find all different sources of food from long distances. 

This capuchin battered around 30m through the trees towards me until he was about 2m away, then climbed precariously along a super thin branch and snatched a wasp nest, which he then took away to pick out what looked like an inner lining to eat. Quite brave moves for a rather strange prize! 

I love the way the light reflects the green of the leaves on his face, and highlights a droplet of water on his cheek.

Three-toed sloth
       
     
Three-toed sloth

Famed for their slow moves and lackadaisical approach to life, sloths can surprise people when they see them on the move, employing more speed than you'd expect. 

 

Bolivian red howler monkey
       
     
Bolivian red howler monkey

I can't even imagine what the first person to hear this monkey's call must have thought... the roar that bellows and echoes through the forest is immense, seemingly filling all space and making you stop in your tracks. Devastatingly, a camera trapping project, Tree Top Manu, have filmed howlers in populated areas who are making the physical signs of calling, but without noise. One hypothesis for this is that the group have learned not to call, adapting their behaviour to avoid being hunted by humans.

'Look mum, no hands!'
       
     
'Look mum, no hands!'

A baby woolly monkey plays and tests its boundaries while mum forages for food nearby.

Lazing around after lunch
       
     
Lazing around after lunch

After a busy search for food this Bolivian red howler lazes about and digests, as another swings down to join. The sun lights up their deep coat, which is in stark contrast to the green of their environment.

Route planning the capuchin way
       
     
Route planning the capuchin way

It would be tempting to anthropomorphise this capuchin, giving its upwards gaze a more poetic meaning, but - in truth - its searching out a route for food, a journey others in its group may follow exactly.